The 52nd Georgia is a Civil War reenacting unit based out of North Georgia. Through battle reenactments, living histories, and memorial services we attempt to educate the public about the life of the average soldier from the state of Georgia during the War Between the States. We consist of two Companies. Company D "Boyd Guards" is based out of Dahlonega, Georgia and Company I is based out of Ringgold, Georgia.

 

This will be my uniform for the 150th Anniversary of Chickamauga. Both the jacket (based on the PVT Thomas Taylor jacket in EoG) and the trousers (indigo on tan jean civilian trousers, similar to those described to be worn by the 37th TN Inf) are handmade. Excellent work, now to get them dirty :)

This will be my uniform for the 150th Anniversary of Chickamauga. Both the jacket (based on the PVT Thomas Taylor jacket in EoG) and the trousers (indigo on tan jean civilian trousers, similar to those described to be worn by the 37th TN Inf) are handmade. Excellent work, now to get them dirty :)

On sheep, wolves, and sheepdogs

By Lt. Col Dave Grossman

Most of the people in our society are sheep. They are kind, gentle, productive creatures who can only hurt one another by accident.” This is true. Remember, the murder rate is six per 100,000 per year, and the aggravated assault rate is four per 1,000 per year. What this means is that the vast majority of Americans are not inclined to hurt one another.

We may well be in the most violent times in history, but violence is still remarkably rare. This is because most citizens are kind, decent people who are not capable of hurting each other, except by accident or under extreme provocation. They are sheep.

Then there are the wolves and the wolves feed on the sheep without mercy. Do you believe there are wolves out there who will feed on the flock without mercy? You better believe it. There are evil men in this world and they are capable of evil deeds. The moment you forget that or pretend it is not so, you become a sheep. There is no safety in denial.

Then there are sheepdogs and I’m a sheepdog. I live to protect the flock and confront the wolf. Or, as a sign in one California law enforcement agency put it, “We intimidate those who intimidate others.”

If you have no capacity for violence then you are a healthy productive citizen: a sheep. If you have a capacity for violence and no empathy for your fellow citizens, then you have defined an aggressive sociopath–a wolf. But what if you have a capacity for violence, and a deep love for your fellow citizens? Then you are a sheepdog, a warrior, someone who is walking the hero’s path. Someone who can walk into the heart of darkness, into the universal human phobia, and walk out unscathed.

We know that the sheep live in denial, that is what makes them sheep. They do not want to believe that there is evil in the world. They can accept the fact that fires can happen, which is why they want fire extinguishers, fire sprinklers, fire alarms and fire exits throughout their kids’ schools. But many of them are outraged at the idea of putting an armed police officer in their kid’s school. Our children are thousands of times more likely to be killed or seriously injured by school violence than fire, but the sheep’s only response to the possibility of violence is denial. The idea of someone coming to kill or harm their child is just too hard, and so they chose the path of denial.

The sheep generally do not like the sheepdog. He looks a lot like the wolf. He has fangs and the capacity for violence. The difference, though, is that the sheepdog must not, cannot and will not ever harm the sheep. Any sheep dog who intentionally harms the lowliest little lamb will be punished and removed. The world cannot work any other way, at least not in a representative democracy or a republic such as ours.

Still, the sheepdog disturbs the sheep. He is a constant reminder that there are wolves in the land. They would prefer that he didn’t tell them where to go, or give them traffic tickets, or stand at the ready in our airports, in camouflage fatigues, holding an M-16. The sheep would much rather have the sheepdog cash in his fangs, spray paint himself white, and go, “Baa.” Until the wolf shows up. Then the entire flock tries desperately to hide behind one lonely sheepdog

members of the “Mill Creek Mess” posing outside of the Clisby Austin House- Tunnel Hill, GA

members of the “Mill Creek Mess” posing outside of the Clisby Austin House- Tunnel Hill, GA

Wounded soldiers awaiting treatment outside of the Clisby Austin House in Tunnel Hill, GA.

Wounded soldiers awaiting treatment outside of the Clisby Austin House in Tunnel Hill, GA.

thecivilwarparlor:

Georgia Brothers- Daniel, John, and Pleasant Chitwood, ca 1861 - 1865
Description: Gordon County, ca. 1861-1865. These three brothers all served in Co. A, 23d Regiment Georgia Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War. Holding handguns and knives.
County:Gordon County Held by:Georgia Archives, 5800 Jonesboro Road, Morrow, GA 30260
Credit: Vanishing Georgia, Georgia Division of Archives and History, Office of Secretary of State.

thecivilwarparlor:

Georgia Brothers- Daniel, John, and Pleasant Chitwood, ca 1861 - 1865

Description: Gordon County, ca. 1861-1865. These three brothers all served in Co. A, 23d Regiment Georgia Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War. Holding handguns and knives.

County:Gordon County Held by:Georgia Archives, 5800 Jonesboro Road, Morrow, GA 30260

Credit: Vanishing Georgia, Georgia Division of Archives and History, Office of Secretary of State.

Siege at Bridgeport

Should have everything together and will be bound for Bridgeport tomorrow afternoon, portraying Company C of the 123d New York Volunteer Infantry. I can’t wait to be back on the field

Here’s a quick look at a secondary impression I’m working on with my Confederate gear

Here’s a quick look at a secondary impression I’m working on with my Confederate gear

Cartridges are rolled, knapsack is packed, and making a list of food items. Eleven days until Bridgeport! This will be my first time out on the field in my 123d NY kit in ages

thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Re-Enactors- Why Do They Do It..

Some reenactors spend hundreds, even thousands each year on Civil War attire, accessories, weapons and camping gear.  People do it now to honor the sacrifices of those who served, and they enjoy sharing the history they are preserving. Some participants are interested in getting a historical perspective on the turbulent times that gripped the nation, particularly if they can trace their ancestry back to those who fought in the war.

Reenacting the American Civil War began even before the real fighting had ended. Civil War veterans recreated battles as a way to remember their fallen comrades and to teach others what the war was all about. The Great Reunion of 1913, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, was attended by more than 50,000 Union and Confederate veterans, and included reenactments of elements of the battle, including Pickett’s Charge.

First Photo: FRILET Patrick Credit: © FRILET Patrick/Hemis/Corbis

Second Photo: first place winner 2010 National Geographic Energizer Photo Contest Winner photo by Roxann Lovette, Statesville NC